PPC Too Expensive for Home Business Niche?

I laugh to myself.

Even some of the PPC gurus will tell you that Home Business and MLM are difficult niches to conquer with Google Adwords.

“The competition is too rough.”

“The bid prices are too high”

I don’t buy it. For the past two years I’ve been generating home business leads, sponsoring reps, and making sales with profit. And in case you think that’s because I’ve got some kind of super powers, go search for my PPC Domination students. You’ll hear their similar success stories in video and blogs all over the internet.

The reason I’m laughing particularly hard today, is that I discovered a campaign I’d neglected recently. It wasn’t bringing much traffic.

A few days ago, while looking at something else in my account, I had set the date range to show “all time”. When I saw 386 leads on this forgotten campaign. I clicked to look inside and found this:

The Neglected AdGroup: 386 Leads at $USD 1.68 (took over two months)
The Neglected AdGroup: Pulled 386 Leads at $USD 1.68 Over a Period of Two Months

Now, I know it’s kind of hard to see the names of the adgroups, and you can’t tell what keywords are in there (hehe I’m evil). That’s because the real secret is that this campaign only targets the Google Content Network. That’s why, in the next few weeks I’ll be releasing some training on the Content Network and show you how to easily get cheap leads like this for your own business.

Anyway, I quickly duplicated the discovery, deleted adgroups, added more adgroups, increased my daily budget, and started to ramp it up.

Today, there are only 10 adgroups in this campaign. I can’t tell you a daily figure it’s bringing because it’s too fresh…but I took this snapshot 4 hours into the day:

After 4 Hours, This AdGroup Pulled 28 Leads at $USD 1.12
After 4 Hours, This Once Neglected AdGroup Pulled 28 Leads at $USD 1.12

The Content Network is a huge part of my advertising strategy and is responsible for two times as many leads as the Google search. Explore it yourself! I know that there’s very little information out there about it though, so I’m bringing on board Content and Placement expert Shelley Ellis to help explain to you.

Go ahead and follow Shelley on Twitter!


To learn more of Jim’s PPC advertising techniques, check out PPC Domination.

The Marketer’s Dirty Little Secret

I’m Grandpa’s favourite. At least, that’s what they say…

The Cancer is taking from his strength every day. And yet, he bends over backwards for me. Every so often, he makes the long, cold hike to my home. He uses a cane as a walking aide.

A loud rattle at my bedroom window wakes me from my sleep.

Being a night-owl, my reversed sleeping hours are unusual. The front-door is on one end of my home and my bedroom all the way on the other. It’s hard to hear anything this far.

Grandpa Going Around the Back
Grandpa Going Around the Back

So he comes around to the back. I wake up to his knocking on the window and greet him through the bars. I inquire about his health.

I’m Grandpa’s favourite. At least, that’s what they say…

The Cancer is taking from his strength every day. And yet, he bends over backwards for me. Every so often, he makes the long, cold hike to my home. He uses a cane as a walking aide.

A loud rattle at my bedroom window wakes me from my sleep.

Being a night-owl, my reversed sleeping hours are unusual. The front-door is on one end of my home and my bedroom all the way on the other. It’s hard to hear anything this far.



grandpa coming round the back


So he comes around to the back. I wake up to his knocking on the window and greet him through the bars. I inquire about his health.


He responds that he missed me.

I invite him inside.

He walks around to the front of the house on the walking stick I got him on my last visit to the USA. Once, he admitted to me that he found the cane I got him to be easier on his hands than the one his son did a few weeks before.

As I see him approach from the corner of the house, I move toward him to embrace him and kiss his cheeks. He smiles. I offer him coffee and cake.

He rarely eats.

Food served by me is an exception he makes. The old man is wrinkled skin and bone–A shadow of his former self.

Amongst the old-timers, they reminisce about his legendary strength. At weddings, a group of them sit around a table talking about the good old days. When you hear them speak, you’d think that there wasn’t a boy he’d not beaten or a fight he’d not won. Elderly women talk of his rugged good looks and remember his dancing, crystal-blue eyes.

I’ve often thought about how I describe my grandfather and how I’d remember him when he’s gone. The painting I’ve drawn here is one example. But my father would say that it’s biased and untrue. He sees his father very differently than I do.

Neither of us is wrong. Our descriptions differ because of something called Re-Framing.

Re-Framing is a way to alter the appearance of information or experiences by changing their context. When you re-frame information, you can help another person experience their actions or view their beliefs from a different perspective.

For example, when a prospect doesn’t show up to a meeting with you and your sponsor, you might say to your sponsor, “Oh no! She’s bailing on me. She doesn’t want to hear our presentation.”

But your sponsor may reply, “What if she had an accident on the way here?”

Although, in both cases, the information doesn’t change (prospect not here), the way your brain views it will cause you to react differently:

On one hand, you might write an angry text message, “You wasted my time! I waited for you and you didn’t have the courtesy to call and cancel!”

And on the other hand, you would make a concerned phone call, “Hello, Claire? Is everything alright?”

How I described my grandfather to you is based on my own experiences with him–as his favourite grandson. Surely, someone else could make him seem frail, old, and annoying.

A relatively new field in Psychology called Neuro-Linguistic Programming (or NLP for short) uses framing and reframing as a way to “program” people’s minds to let go of bad habits or acquire new habits. NLP has recently found many important applications in sales and marketing. Because, it’s nothing more than a way to communicate more effectively.

Smart marketers use re-framing to ignite the desired emotion or belief in their customer. They can make you feel excited about clicking their link, opting in to their marketing funnel, or buying their solution.

A dirty secret of marketing is that you can take the very same information, package it up with two or more frames, and then sell it to the SAME people. And they’ll buy one of each.

For example:

  • Mark Joyner in Mind Control Marketing uses the frame: “Military mind control techniques scary as hell like Hitler used on the Nazi.”

  • Joe Vitale in Hypnotic Writing uses the frame: “How to write in a way so compelling of buying behaviour that it’s like hypnosis.”

  • Frank Kern in Mass Control uses the frame: “Techniques to help you control the masses and influence mass buying behaviour.”

Since the dawn of time, what works in marketing has remained unchanged. The major contribution and success of an author is simply how they deliver their information. You’ll see these examples in every ad, in every religion, in every best-selling story, and in every blockbuster movie. It’s a means we communicate by. It’s how we motivate, affect, and challenge each others’ beliefs.

Did you, by any chance, pick a favourite frame from the above three examples? I know I did 😉

Framing and Re-Framing are important marketing concepts. I use them all the time…Including how I described my grandfather to you earlier. I wanted you to feel a certain way about him…the same way I do, because I adore the man…

In my sun room, he only stays a few minutes. He puffs tobacco with shaking arthritic fingers. Conversation is dry. But I sit with him because I know that means the world.

When he leaves, the aroma of his imported tobacco lingers behind him. His half-drank, overly sweetened coffee sits on the table steaming slightly by the chair he occupied moments before.





Grandfather Relaxing in Front of My Home
Grandfather Relaxing in Front of My Home





I’m fond of him. He’s child-like in his innocence. So sensitive and easily made to cry.

I’ll never forget a few months ago when my father sent me to tell him the bad news. Grand Dad’s sister passed away. I arrived at his door and he opened after my first knock. He held me tight at the door before I could say a word. I assumed the news must have reached him already.

But it hadn’t.

When he learned that she died the previous night he cried and cried. He had a rough life working in his grandfather’s farms. He was orphaned young and his sister was the only mother-figure he had.

My father knows him differently, though. Maybe it’s because to him, Grand Dad is the ruthless man who beat him viciously every day when he was a child. And such is his love for his father, that he still strives for his approval even today.

It’s useless. Grand Dad will never tell him he’s proud.

When my father offers him a cup of coffee, Grand Dad gets mad.

And, now, my father hates the cigarette stink Grand Dad leaves behind.

Double Digit CTR – Part 3

Experiment 3 – Split-Testing Ads to Increase Conversion

Over the weekend, I began testing a second ad variation. The reason was that of the two running ads: Ad #1 had a click-thru-rate of 15% and Ad #2 had a click-thru-rate of 3.5%.

Additionally, Ad #1 (higher CTR) was converting at 7%, while Ad #2 (lower CTR) was converting at 17%.

I killed Ad #2. Then created a new version of it with the same body because it was most likely responsible for the high conversion rate–and replaced its headline with the headline of Ad #1 because that is the most likely cause of the Ad #1’s high click-thru-rate.

Really busy. Much to do. And very sick.

Popped in for a quickie today…to report on the experiment results.

Remember a few days ago I discovered a keyword research method that gets double-digit Click-thru-rates on my PPC ads. Unfortunately, the new technique at the time gave me zero conversions.

A mistake I’d made was that I ran the ads against a brand new un-tested landing page, effectively testing TWO variables at once: The new keyword strategy AND the new landing page.

Well, later in that same Double Digit CTR experiment, I reverted back to the original landing page to undo that minstake. That page had been tried and tested for months and converted at 10-12% with other keywords. So I ran it for a few hours to see if it fared better.

And sure enough, it did. So for Double-Digit CTR Experiment #2 I cleaned up the 500 keywords and narrowed them down to only 3.

The 3 keywords I kept were the “diamond in the rough”. At the time, they were running with a combined CTR of 9%, several hundred impressions, and had at least one conversion in the few hours they sent serachers to the original landing page.

In Experiment 2, I tested and created the control: Those three keywords were left running over the next 24-hours without any further changes of any kind, in order to be sure that they continued to convert. And I’m happy to report that they did.

Experiment 3 – Split-Testing Ads to Increase Conversion

Over the weekend, I began testing a second ad variation. The reason was that of the two running ads: Ad #1 had a click-thru-rate of 15% and Ad #2 had a click-thru-rate of 3.5%.

Additionally, Ad #1 (higher CTR) was converting at 7%, while Ad #2 (lower CTR) was converting at 17%.

I killed Ad #2. Then created a new version of it with the same body because it was most likely responsible for the high conversion rate–and replaced its headline with the headline of Ad #1 because that is the most likely cause of the Ad #1’s high click-thru-rate.

I left this to run over the rest of the weekend and today. 

The result? 13.8% conversion at $5 CPA (a bit high still), and combined CTR of 12%.

Today (so far) that single adgroup with 3 keywords has produced 9 conversions. Whereas before it was lucky to get 9 conversions a week.

Good Job!

What’s next?

The Cost Per Acquisition (CPA) is still too high for my liking. I need to make split-tests with the landing page and try to increase my conversion rate another few percent. Also, the high CTR will likely be rewarded over time with lower bid costs, so it will go down on its own.

Today, I’m ready to replicate this for another adgroup.

I shared with you these results to show you how methodical you need to be when playing the game of Google Adwords. And to show you that I too make mistakes and run into difficulty…then I keep at it until I resolve it.


To learn more of Jim’s PPC advertising techniques, check out PPC Domination.

Double Digit CTR – Part 2

Yesterday I told you about a PPC experiment I ran that resulted in a 12% CTR over the span of an entire day.

Today, I want to share with you Experiment 2. But before I do, let’s talk about a couple of your concerns here:

Why is a high Click-Thru-Rate (CTR) & Zero Conversions Considered a Success?

Yesterday I told you about a PPC experiment I ran that resulted in a 12% CTR over the span of an entire day.

Today, I want to share with you Experiment 2. But before I do, let’s talk about a couple of your concerns here:

Why is a high Click-Thru-Rate (CTR) & Zero Conversions Considered a Success?

Something I left out yesterday was that I was testing my keywords with a brand new landing page that had never been run before on any PPC experiment.

I would normally NOT test more than one variable at a time, but the double-digit-CTR was an unexpected bonus result. Because, at the time I put up the new page, I was trying to improve conversion rates, not click-thru.

When I started, I was convinced that the new page would perform better than any other before it. After all, it had all the elements of sound marketing and was extremely Google friendly as was seen by my very high Quality Score.

Unfortunately, this was a bad assumption.

It converted nothing. So after I made my post yesterday, I changed the target URL to the old landing page that used to convert at 12%. When I did, I finally started to get some conversions!

Either way, though, the high click-thru-rate was a good result. Because you can’t get conversions if you’re not getting enough clicks. By increasing click-thru, I increased the pool of visitors to my site that I could potentially convert with a better landing page. I can then spend the rest of my time working on finding that winning, better-converting, landing page.

Scrapping the new- and returning to the old-landing page was the first step.

Should You Ignore My Previous Advice About Having Only One Keyword Per Adgroup?

No.

The advice is based on an important adwords principle that will never change. Always, always, always keep your adgroup keywords around a single very tight idea. Your keywords and ad should be a perfect match for one another. You get ultimate control with a single keyword.

Adding hundreds of keywords into the same adgroup was just a temporary research phase that helped me avoid customising new ads for all my keywords without knowing which ones are worth my time.

It cost about $30 to find out.

But if i continued to run this as is, I would lose that $30 every single day.

Experiment 2: The Control…

This morning, after a full day’s worth of data, I studied my keywords closely.

I sorted by CTR and considered breaking the ads with high CTR out on their own.

Bad idea. Some of those keywords only had a few impressions with very high CTR. With the passing of time and more impressions, those keywords may sink to the bottom.

Then, I considered the ad position. I looked at keywords that had lowest rank and considered increasing their bids. But what would that do?

It would get more clicks…but not conversions.

That’s an experiment best left for another day.

Several ideas later, I decided what to do: I sorted by conversions and found I had THREE top performing keywords. These were the “diamond in the rough”. Their combined CTR was 9.28%. Not quite a double-digit-CTR but still very high. They had several hundred impressions each from yesterday’s experiment. And each had converted at least once in the last 24-hrs.

I paused all other keywords. They were just costing money and would distract me if I left them on. I’ll come back to them later.

Meanwhile, I let the three sexy keywords keep running.

Today’s experiment is called the “Control”.

I will run them for 24-hrs without changing anything. I want to see if they continue to perform well after having swapped back to the original landing page. It’s probably a bad time to run such an experiment because it’s Saturday and that’s rarely a typical day.

On the other hand, I just need some preliminary data to tell me it’s worth working on the landing page. I’ll run more “statistically sound” experiments later on the landing page.

Stay tuned, let’s see how this pans out.


To learn more of Jim’s PPC advertising techniques, check out PPC Domination.

Double Digit CTR, wtf!?

Today I decided to try something new with my Google Adwords PPC ads.

I added 500 keywords to the SAME adgroup and gave them individual bids. That’s pretty crazy for me considering I usually have ONE keyword (with 2-3 matching types) per adgroup. And so far it’s been working brilliantly for me.

But today, I decided to give the multiple-keywords-in-an-adgroup trick a go–it’s part of my original 1,000 leads/day challenge I set maybe a month or so ago (if you remember).

Today I decided to try something new with my Google Adwords PPC ads.

Hear this story first…

A few weeks ago I was guest of an online Radio Show courtesy of my pal Ben Settle.  The main topic was Google Adwords and I was brought on to talk about my experience with PPC. While on the call, the other guest showed a snapshot of his adwords account where he was bidding on over 400 keywords–get this–in the SAME adgroup. That’s something a lot of experts, including Perry Marshall will tell you is a biiiiig no-no.

Well the surprising part that had me baffled was that he had a 93% conversion rate. Dude, there’s the very same screenshot I saw in the captioned image below. What a guy! Seriously, I have been impressed since and that’s a really long time to be impressed with someone, ok?

Today, I thought finally to give it a go myself.

I added 500 keywords to the SAME adgroup and gave them individual bids. That’s pretty crazy for me considering I usually have ONE keyword (with 2-3 matching types) per adgroup. And so far it’s been working brilliantly.

But I decided to give the multiple-keywords-in-an-adgroup trick a go. After all, I’m still working on my original 1,000 leads/day challenge that I set maybe a month or so ago (if you remember).

This Adwords Account Snapshot Had Me Baffled: 400+ Keywords In The Same AdGroup With a 93% Conversion Rate With A Landing Page That Should Never Have Converted!
This Adwords Account Snapshot Had Me Baffled: 400+ Keywords In The Same AdGroup With a 93% Conversion Rate With A Landing Page That Should Never Have Converted!

One of the lessons I learned through my online marketing experience is that just because something is working doesn’t mean it’s the best way. So what were the results of this experiment?

First, my click-thru-rate on that adgroup went from 1.5% to 12%. Heck yes! Double digit CTR!

That doesn’t even make sense. Considering that i’m using the exact same ad on 500 keywords. Theoretically, the more targeted the ad is to the keyword, the better response it should get. Here, instead, 500 different keywords with the same (much less tailored ad) are getting clicked more frequantly. Here’s why I think this happened:

When bidding on just a single keyword I would use the same bid for potentially 1000’s of searches. But when I’m targeting longer-tail keyword derivatives I’m gaining the advantage of being able to put down individual bids more customised to each search string’s competition. And I also think that Google is giving preference to my ad over others, regardless of my bids, because I’m telling it specifically (instead of implying) that it should show the ad on those exact search strings.

There is a down-side to this trick though.

My conversion rate shot all the way down. I mean, there’s literally ZERO conversions for the couple of hundreds clicks accumulated today.

Expensive experiment. But a very valuable lesson learned about increasing click-thru-rate.

Now, onto figuring out how to make the landing page convert more of those clicks!


To learn more of Jim’s PPC advertising techniques, check out PPC Domination.

Keyword Research: Shall I Spy On My PPC Competitors?

Keyword Spy Tools are supposed to be able to allow you to plugin in the website of your competitors and then they retrieve for you all the keywords they’re bidding on, along with their corresponding ads, and estimated bids. Sounds pretty useful doesn’t it?

Yet I’m gonna go ahead and tell you NOT to use these tools. I think your money is better spent on your PPC ads.

I’ve had more than a few questions about keyword research tools that claim to help you “spy” on your competition. (Don’t get too excited & click just yet) Examples are Spyfu, Keyword Spy, and most recently, PPC Web Spy.

Brad Callens PPC Web Spy
Brad Callen's "PPC Web Spy"

The tools are supposed to be able to allow you to plug in the address of your competitions’ websites to retrieve all the keywords they’re bidding on in sponsored search. Also included, is usually a copy of the corresponding ads and estimated bids. Sounds pretty useful doesn’t it?

Not really.

I’m gonna tell you NOT to research like this. There are better ways to spend your money (like on your PPC ads). And more effective ways to beat competitors to the top of the search page.

Am I saying this because it’s immoral to spy and steal the campaigns of others? No.

It’s because Spy tools don’t deliver on their claims.

To non-technical folks, computer programmers are like magicians. They create magic with their computer code and do amazing nearly miraculous things. But another programmer looking in from the outside can still see the thin string that pulls cards into the magician’s sleeve. They can see that the magic is nothing but an illusion.

Spy tools are an illusion. A marketing gimmick. There is a market for them because people are lazy. I mean, sure it would be nice to just find a successful affiliate promoting the same offer as us and then steal their campaign for ourselves…right?

Except that Spy tools generally return untargeted keywords that no one in their right mind is bidding on. Their bid estimates are WAY off. And they don’t tell you the REAL secrets of why someone else’s ads are working.

For example, they won’t tell you:

  • How the advertiser organises his/her account.
  • Or the negative keywords they include in their keyword lists.
  • Or the way they group their keywords.
  • Or the way they monetize their clicks.

That’s the real stuff worth paying for. And I’m pretty sure if a tool could tell you all of that, it would cost a lot more than $96 a month.

I buy and test just about every PPC tool you’ve ever come across.

Spy tools work by “guessing” keywords, monitoring which ads show up, and then adding them into a database they do lookups on when you use the tool’s search.

They definitely don’t have a way to go into people’s accounts and steal their keywords. There are keywords left out, quite often the money keywords! Also, there are many keywords returned by the spy tool that don’t actually trigger those ads. The bid estimates are wayyyy off. The click estimates are always wrong.

It’s a big collection of unrelated information, gathered from god knows where, and combined in a way to look authoritative. All of it designed to trick you into believing you’ve seen into the inner workings of your competitors’ ad campaigns. When all you’ve done is fallen for an illusion.

Read the small print on keyword spy tools, you’ll find they have disclaimers reflecting their anticipated unreliability.

PPC Bully
PPC Bully

The only real way to beat up your competition and take their spot in the sponsored results, is to monitor them over time, identify the winners, learn from them, and then do it better.

If you insist on spending your money on a Keyword Spy tool, then save your dollars for this next one:

I am at the moment in the process of testing a tool called PPC Bully. This is different because it’s not framed as a “spy” tool–it simply automates studying the competition before you start spending your own money bidding on an expensive keyword.

A couple of years ago, I got bored of manually checking the competition by hand. So I wrote a very simple program to make my job easier:

The way it worked was, I’d give it a bunch of keywords I was considering bidding on. And at a defined interval throughout the day, this little program would go out and simulate searches on all those keywords. It would then retrieve all the sponsored ads that are returned and log them for me to study later.

Here’s the theory:

An advertiser who is losing money with their ad+keyword+landing page combination is going to do one of two things:

  • They’re gonna be savvy enough to take their ad down, modify it, and try a new combination
  • Or, they’re gonna leave it till Google slides it down in position and probably slaps it to hell so it won’t show up in sponsored ads any more

Either way, the end result, is that over time, the ads that don’t work stop showing.

On the other hand, if you’re looking for advertisers that are probably making money, all you need to do is find the ad+keyword+landing page combinations that show up EVERY time the program simulates the search for those keywords over an extended period of time. That could be a day, a week, or even a month depending on how competitive the keyword is.

PPC Bully tests your competitors like this.

It isn’t my program. Some bright marketers hired programmers and turned the idea into a commercial service.

Now, if you’re thinking about bidding on some expensive keywords, it’s easy to avoid risking your own money. Just run PPC Bully with that keyword and monitor the competition for a week or so. Find the winning combination of keyword+ad+landing page, and then try to do something similar without violating copyrights.

All I know is that out of all the spy tools I’ve seen so far, the $49 investment in PPC Bully is the only one worth exploring.


To learn more of Jim’s PPC advertising techniques, check out PPC Domination.

Brain Food for the Up-Late Marketer

I’m a creature of the night.

Since I was in high school, I preferred working when everyone else was asleep. Some how, the quiet of the night helps me be more productive and creative.

Of course, all the hard work makes me hungry!

If you were to ever visit me, you might be surprised to hear clanging of dishes, and pots and pans in the kitchen when I get the midnight munchies. My snacks are usually quick to make, light, and balanced. It’s about the only way I keep healthy lately since I rarely get any exercise in the winter.

One of my Simpler "Midnight" Snack Trays I've Made Famous on Twitter
One of my Simpler "Midnight" Snack Trays I've Made Famous on Twitter

I’m a creature of the night.

Since I was in high school, I preferred working when everyone else was asleep. Some how, the quiet of the night helps me be more productive and creative.

Of course, all the hard work makes me hungry!

If you were to ever visit me, you might be surprised to hear clanging of dishes, and pots and pans in the kitchen when I get the midnight munchies. My snacks are usually quick to make, light, and balanced. It’s about the only way I keep healthy lately since I rarely get any exercise in the winter.

You might know that recently I’ve been posting on Twitter, updates about my various “dinner” trays and their content.

Couple of nights ago, I was low on food-variety in the house…so I came up with a simple snack. When I laid it on my desk ready to be eaten, I noticed the camera lying on my desk and I thought I would take a snapshot for my curious marketing friends.

Does it get simpler than this?

Lebneh (thickened yoghurt) seasoned with red pepper, black pepper, and zaatar, served with olive oil
Lebneh (thickened yoghurt) seasoned with red pepper, black pepper, and zaatar, served with olive oil

Here’s a plate of thickened yoghurt called Lebneh in this part of the world. It’s made by slowly straining fresh yoghurt in a cotton cloth overnight. Most of the moisture drips out and what’s left inside the cloth is a thick, cheese-like yoghurt.

Usually it’s served with aged olive oil drizzled on top. And it’s eaten with a warm loaf of lebanese bread.

I like to make it a little more interesting, so i put on some green chilli, red pepper, black pepper, and zaatar. Zaatar is another traditional food usually served on a saucer with a bowl of olive oil and you use small pieces of bread to dip in the olive oil then in the zaatar which adheses itself to the bread.

Zaatar is a blend of Thyme and sesame seeds.

Salad of apple, cucumber, banana sprinkled with pepper and sugar
Salad of apple, cucumber, banana sprinkled with pepper and sugar

On the side is my salad. It’s not a proper salad because it’s eaten with hands. There’s large slices of a whole apple, a cucumber, and a banana. Sprinkled on top is black pepper and a couple of pinches of sugar. They help lift the flavour and make the combination work together.

And in the glass is my apple juice.

Simple and quick. Try it if you wanna feed your marketing brain what my marketing brain eats haha.

To Do Today

  1. Build content campaign templates in master account
  2. Create keyword research video
  3. Beat Ivan on Facebook Bejeweled
  4. Finish creating Google Friendly landing page
  5. Listen to Perry Belcher’s Social Media training
  6. Complete Perry Belcher and Ryan Diess’ bonus materials

guess which items are gonna end up getting done TODAY lol…i’m banking on 3 and maybe 1 😛

Making Easy Money With Replicated Systems, a Dying Myth

One Tree Hill was a landmark that facinated me when I was small…

I could see it from my childhood home.

Our house was 30 years old when we moved in. It was made from Rimu tree, and was transfered from another city in the middle of the night on the back of an enormous truck. When it arrived on our very sloped land at dawn, it was mounted upon thick wooden posts and made to stand level with the slope’s highest point.


One Tree Hill, Auckland, New Zealand.

One Tree Hill was a landmark that fascinated me when I was small…

I could see it from my childhood home.

Our house was 30 years old when we moved in. It was made from Rimu tree, and was transferred from another city in the middle of the night on the back of an enormous truck.

When it arrived on our very sloped land at dawn, it was mounted upon thick wooden posts and made to stand level with the slope’s highest point.

Ours was the tallest house in the neighbourhood. And from its strange double-glazed living-room window, I could see across to the other side of the city. There, in the distance stood a single tree waving alongside a dark tower on a “hill”. One Tree Hill.

It was a long time before I finally visited.

The road we drove on wound around what seemed more like a mountain. And as i leaped out of the car, excited, with the wind whipping my hair against my face, I saw my beloved tree and tower in all their glory.

As I came closer to inspect, I noticed two tree stumps in the ground.

“Daddy, this is THREE Tree Hill! Look, two trees next to this were cut. See?”

My father shrugged at where I pointed. No one ever talked about those two tree stumps. I always wondered why.

One day, my teacher assigned us a project to write our own Maori-style myth.

Maori myths had certain distinguishing features: There were man-like-gods for everything. And they were amazing.

There was Maui who caught, beat, and tamed the sun, fished the North Island out of the sea, and tried to conquer death. Then there was my favourite, Tane. He was one of the strongest gods and reigned over the forest. Also, there was Aroha the goddess of love. And earth mother Papa and sky father Rangi who were pushed apart by their children when they grew restless in the darkness between them.

Maori myths were told to children and served as explanations for things their parents didn’t know the answers to back then.

I didn’t know why One Tree Hill had two stumps. So I told this story…

Myth: Kupe Fighting Sea Creatures
Myth: Kupe Fighting Sea Creatures


There were two young gods–Tane and Rangi.

They made the forest before Tane created man. Rangi fell in love with another goddess named Aroha and wanted to build her a wooden hut in Tane’s forest. Tane was horrified that Rangi should cut up the trees they had worked hard to create. In a fit of rage, he turned Rangi and Aroha into small seeds. He threw them far away at the top of the highest mountain.

As years past, Rangi and Aroha grew into strong trees and had a small child of their own. Tane was not a forgiving god…and when he found out, he chopped Aroha and her child. But not Rangi. Though he tried, he was unsuccessful because Rangi was one of the original immortal gods.

To an 11 year old, this simplistic story gave an entertaining explanation for the tree stumps. It was a myth for children.

Later, when I grew up I learned that One Tree Hill was at the center of a protest for Maori rights…an angry protestor tried to chop the tree in the middle of the night. Luckily, he was stopped in time.

We’ll come back to the tree a little later. For now, I want to talk about another myth believed by adults…

When the Internet went mainstream, many fortunes were made online. We hear about these lucky people’s stories in the news. Boys were paid 1.6 billion for a little video sharing website called YouTube. A PhD project turned into one of the most recognised names on the internet…Google. College-drop-out turned down a billion dollars for his year-book-like social network…Facebook.

I grew up dreaming of making my fortune online like them. These amazing, intelligent, legends of the Internet were my heroes.

I wasn’t the only dreamer. This stuff became the stuff of myth. Told and spread between adults. There came a time when you didn’t even need to convince anyone that they could get rich quick on the internet. All they had to do was hire a web designer and start an online store-front and woow over-night riches.

Although it’s never been THAT easy to make a lot of money online, until very recently, it was relatively simple. I mean, not so long ago, you could make $15 for 15 minutes of work just by filling out surveys (not any more).

Or you could go to clickbank, commission junction, or amazon and pick the first ready-made product you see with a decent pay-out. You take their sales page and throw together a video or Google ad and drive people directly to the sale.

It’s not like that today.

As more and more people flocked to these internet marketing systems, funded proposals, affiliate programs, and adsense content generators…the internet became saturated with duplicate content. Not long after, a searcher would be faced with millions of results made up of testimonials and reviews that all went to the same sale page, for the same product.

In effect, what is happening now, is that the myth has spread:

“Much money can be made for relatively no effort on the internet!”

And it’s being sold and believed over and over by every opportunist.

While thousands of new people flock to start businesses online using these “simple systems”, what is in effect happening is that thousands of clone businesses are being opened in the very same marketplace.

Their clone businesses sell the same products, to the same prospects, using the same offers, and the same sales pitch. They are in a stale-mate…brutally fighting for the same chunk of market with exactly the same weapons.

The result? Customers are divided and spread very thin between them all. Only a little money (if any) can be made in each clone-business.

One of the winners, in this situation, is the system owner.

Think about it…

All of the myth-inspired “business” owners are spending and risking their own effort, money, and time in the hope of earning commissions. The response they see is minimal–say 1 sale a week. While on the other hand, the system owner is making money on the 1 sale/week over 10,000 affiliates (or system users). That’s 10,000 sales a week with zero extra effort on their part.

Yet, the system owners aren’t the demons in this myth.

They’re just making it easy for people to start. Because they know that most promoters are myth-buyers and they will not stay around to duplicate more than one time. So they make it easy for them to duplicate that once.

On the other hand, the people who DO make the big bucks don’t rely on the system on its own. They’re out there creating a unique experience for customers. They’re making it a point to stand out from the clones. Because they know the myth for what it is–a piece of fiction for children.

They’re out there building a real business on sound, scientific principles. They’re sharpening stronger, better weapons by developing their Unique Selling Proposition (USP). They understand supply and demand. They’re learning marketing skills to beat the clones with.

These are the people who outsource landing page creation, list building, autoresponders, and copy.

As the stories travel and spread, more late-comers will come hoping for a slice of pie. But it’s going to keep thinning and getting harder until the myth is shattered and makes sense no more.

“Make easy money online” will be DEAD!

Just like the tree on One Tree Hill. Sacrificed in a political demonstration for rights. The news was broken a few years ago that after the attack on “Rangi”, my favourite tree was too weak to continue to stand on its own. It became an accident risk. And the decision was made to chop it down.

So much for my myth’s immortal god.

Now the hill has three stumps and a tower. No Tree Hill.


No Tree Hill :(
No Tree Hill :(