Along Came a Spider

Last summer was perfect…

The weather was warm with a mild breeze. Compared to the sticky and humid Sydney summers I’d been through over the past three years, this was heaven. With relaxed body and clear mind, here I planned to create, record, and compile PPC Domination.

I arrived in Amman international airport in the afternoon. My baby brother picked me up.

Even though he’s nine years younger, I noticed he was now much taller than me. We kissed and embraced in our traditional style. I flinched as he brushed his stubbled chin on my cheek.

Sydney was behind me.

With a great sense of relief, I’d given away all my furniture to the Salvation Army, packed ONE bag with three changes of clothes, my computer hard drives, and my marketing books. Where I was going, I didn’t need any of it. So I burned everything else. Said goodbye to the only true friend I made in three years and boarded the plane.

Ironically, my greatest lesson in marketing was not to be found in those books I took with me.

It was, of all things, inside the garden of my fortress.

Home in Amman
Home in Amman

My home in Amman sits on top of a mountain. The rear-wall is unnecessary because it’s shielded from wind and weather by forest. But for the other three sides, the walls had to be errected high to keep the garden safe.

The garden is dear to me. It’s the envy of guests and the topic-of-choice with every outdoor feast.

All around the house, within its walls, a gardener helps carefully plant and maintain trees, vegetables, and fruit.

In the back, he’s planted plums, peaches, and cherries which are quite mature now. In their season, buckets overflow with sweet fruit.

The front entrance has roses that blossom in multiple colours–almost immediately after being watered. Even now, as spring approaches, orange and black butterflies jump from one flower bud to the next.

Lined along the edges of the courtyard are lavender, sage, rosemary, mint, camomile, and thyme plants. When guests visit, they enjoy a special hot drink made from their mixed leaves while sitting around the fountain. Their children watch a movie projected on the west wall.

My favourite part of the garden, is one of the small “vineyards” right by the gate.

Here in the vineyard is where I made a remarkable marketing observation. Taught to me by nature itself.

Grapes Dangling From Above
Grapes Dangling From Above

In this part of the world, vines are hung and strung high. Metal bars are connected in a ceiling structure with lengths of wire between them. The vines are made to wind around these wires. When the vines bear fruit, the heavy load dangles from above.

Last summer, the first harvest was ripe and ready for picking.

As I stood in the shade of the leaves on a ladder clipping thick vines laden with grapes into buckets, I noticed spiders. The little guys were making homes between the tangles of grapes, leaves, and vines.

This discovery was strange to me. At first, I thought it was cute that the spiders shared my love of grapes. In fact, I thought they were the ones making the holes in some of them. But as I clipped on, I saw the truth.

These spiders were not fruit eaters. Some of their webs held captive small, dead and dying insects. They were actually predators!

After some research, I learned that spiders discovered, as they evolved through the ages, that grapes made excellent homes. Grapes with their bright colours, fragrant aroma, and sweet juices attract all kinds of insects. Spiders who live in a vineyard don’t have to work to eat–All they have to do is make their deadly webs between vines and wait. Dinner will be served.

Vineyards are a spider’s dream.

Here was the Attraction Marketing principle being demonstrated in nature itself. No marketing book could have showed me so colourfully what it means to find a rabid buyer base and give them exactly what they want.

Marketing, when you follow this basic principle is easy.

I feel sorry for network marketers who sleaze themselves all over their customers in the social networks: “Take a look at my widget”, “Please, visit my site!”, “Add me!”, or “Join my business!”

Because, if you have attractive goods, exposed to the right market, you would never need to ask.

You wouldn’t have to push for the sale. Ever.

In the case of the spider, he found insects already “buying” and made his web.

Hey and don’t think spiders are the only creatures who figured out how to use attraction marketing to lure eager customers into their web.

Think of the colourful roses and flowers in my garden blossoming in spring. Their fragrances being blown through the air and their sweet nectar rewarding the bee or butterfly that approaches. These insects, after they drink from the flower’s nectar, go on to repay the favour with a service: The service of carrying the flower’s pollen from male to female so their species can survive.

These laws of nature have evolved through millions of years of trial and error. Insects who failed have already paid with their lives, and sometimes their species’ existence.

As marketers, we need to take a lesson from nature: Marketing is easy when you live inside the vineyard:

  • Go where people are already looking and buying: Buyers search with search engines, so market there using PPC Google Adwords or Yahoo SEM.
  • Bid on buyer-keywords: People in buying mode know what they’re looking for–they’re running searches with specialised vocabulary, and industry jargon like “downline” and “sponsor”. Position yourself in front of searches like that, not the broad “work from home” kind.
  • Advertise an attractive bait that searchers want: People are looking for solutions and answers to their questions. They’re not looking for pills, potions, or MLMs.
  • Lay a web with your baited lead capture pages: Offer something valuable (not a sales pitch) in exchange for contact information.
  • Reward visitors of your site with a small taste of what they’ve been looking for: Once you get contact information, demonstrate to the prospect the happy experience of their problem solved with your product, service, or business opportunity.
  • Slowly expose them to your ideas so that the sale is a simple matter of fact: When you educate someone, they adopt your way of thinking and decision-making. They don’t need to be sold.

Remember, social networks are not the place for our sales pitches. People there want “fun” and socialization. Selling there makes people run away from you.

Heck, the spider gets it. He uses attraction marketing to survive. Surely, we can too.

Author: Jim Yaghi

Jim Yaghi is an advertising consultant and traffic expert, with a background in Artificial Intelligence.

3 thoughts on “Along Came a Spider”

  1. Great story telling Jim… and congrats too… because once you "get" this concept — making mulah gets pretty easy eh?

    Later

    Caleb

    P.S. I had no idea where you live, after googling and wikipedia readin' it looks beautiful there :)

  2. Great story telling Jim… and congrats too… because once you “get” this concept — making mulah gets pretty easy eh?

    Later
    Caleb

    P.S. I had no idea where you live, after googling and wikipedia readin' it looks beautiful there :)

  3. Hey Jim

    looks like the time in Aman wakes up the philosopher in you :-) Seriously, its a very well laid out description of the attraction marketing principle. I enjoyed reading every bit of it.And hey, it would be cool to see some more pics of your castle you built, form the bits and pieces that are visible it looks awesome king yaghi :-)

    greetings from your friend in switzerland

    Andreas

  4. Hey Jim

    looks like the time in Aman wakes up the philosopher in you :-) Seriously, its a very well laid out description of the attraction marketing principle. I enjoyed reading every bit of it.And hey, it would be cool to see some more pics of your castle you built, form the bits and pieces that are visible it looks awesome king yaghi :-)

    greetings from your friend in switzerland
    Andreas

  5. Hi, Jim, I got to your blog via Ben Settle. Really like the focus on ethics, attraction, etc.–all stuff I write about regularly.

    Amman is definitely on my list to visit someday.

    Shel Horowitz
    Twitter: @shelhorowitz

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