The Marketer’s Dirty Little Secret

I’m Grandpa’s favourite. At least, that’s what they say…

The Cancer is taking from his strength every day. And yet, he bends over backwards for me. Every so often, he makes the long, cold hike to my home. He uses a cane as a walking aide.

A loud rattle at my bedroom window wakes me from my sleep.

Being a night-owl, my reversed sleeping hours are unusual. The front-door is on one end of my home and my bedroom all the way on the other. It’s hard to hear anything this far.

Grandpa Going Around the Back
Grandpa Going Around the Back

So he comes around to the back. I wake up to his knocking on the window and greet him through the bars. I inquire about his health.

I’m Grandpa’s favourite. At least, that’s what they say…

The Cancer is taking from his strength every day. And yet, he bends over backwards for me. Every so often, he makes the long, cold hike to my home. He uses a cane as a walking aide.

A loud rattle at my bedroom window wakes me from my sleep.

Being a night-owl, my reversed sleeping hours are unusual. The front-door is on one end of my home and my bedroom all the way on the other. It’s hard to hear anything this far.



grandpa coming round the back


So he comes around to the back. I wake up to his knocking on the window and greet him through the bars. I inquire about his health.


He responds that he missed me.

I invite him inside.

He walks around to the front of the house on the walking stick I got him on my last visit to the USA. Once, he admitted to me that he found the cane I got him to be easier on his hands than the one his son did a few weeks before.

As I see him approach from the corner of the house, I move toward him to embrace him and kiss his cheeks. He smiles. I offer him coffee and cake.

He rarely eats.

Food served by me is an exception he makes. The old man is wrinkled skin and bone–A shadow of his former self.

Amongst the old-timers, they reminisce about his legendary strength. At weddings, a group of them sit around a table talking about the good old days. When you hear them speak, you’d think that there wasn’t a boy he’d not beaten or a fight he’d not won. Elderly women talk of his rugged good looks and remember his dancing, crystal-blue eyes.

I’ve often thought about how I describe my grandfather and how I’d remember him when he’s gone. The painting I’ve drawn here is one example. But my father would say that it’s biased and untrue. He sees his father very differently than I do.

Neither of us is wrong. Our descriptions differ because of something called Re-Framing.

Re-Framing is a way to alter the appearance of information or experiences by changing their context. When you re-frame information, you can help another person experience their actions or view their beliefs from a different perspective.

For example, when a prospect doesn’t show up to a meeting with you and your sponsor, you might say to your sponsor, “Oh no! She’s bailing on me. She doesn’t want to hear our presentation.”

But your sponsor may reply, “What if she had an accident on the way here?”

Although, in both cases, the information doesn’t change (prospect not here), the way your brain views it will cause you to react differently:

On one hand, you might write an angry text message, “You wasted my time! I waited for you and you didn’t have the courtesy to call and cancel!”

And on the other hand, you would make a concerned phone call, “Hello, Claire? Is everything alright?”

How I described my grandfather to you is based on my own experiences with him–as his favourite grandson. Surely, someone else could make him seem frail, old, and annoying.

A relatively new field in Psychology called Neuro-Linguistic Programming (or NLP for short) uses framing and reframing as a way to “program” people’s minds to let go of bad habits or acquire new habits. NLP has recently found many important applications in sales and marketing. Because, it’s nothing more than a way to communicate more effectively.

Smart marketers use re-framing to ignite the desired emotion or belief in their customer. They can make you feel excited about clicking their link, opting in to their marketing funnel, or buying their solution.

A dirty secret of marketing is that you can take the very same information, package it up with two or more frames, and then sell it to the SAME people. And they’ll buy one of each.

For example:

  • Mark Joyner in Mind Control Marketing uses the frame: “Military mind control techniques scary as hell like Hitler used on the Nazi.”

  • Joe Vitale in Hypnotic Writing uses the frame: “How to write in a way so compelling of buying behaviour that it’s like hypnosis.”

  • Frank Kern in Mass Control uses the frame: “Techniques to help you control the masses and influence mass buying behaviour.”

Since the dawn of time, what works in marketing has remained unchanged. The major contribution and success of an author is simply how they deliver their information. You’ll see these examples in every ad, in every religion, in every best-selling story, and in every blockbuster movie. It’s a means we communicate by. It’s how we motivate, affect, and challenge each others’ beliefs.

Did you, by any chance, pick a favourite frame from the above three examples? I know I did 😉

Framing and Re-Framing are important marketing concepts. I use them all the time…Including how I described my grandfather to you earlier. I wanted you to feel a certain way about him…the same way I do, because I adore the man…

In my sun room, he only stays a few minutes. He puffs tobacco with shaking arthritic fingers. Conversation is dry. But I sit with him because I know that means the world.

When he leaves, the aroma of his imported tobacco lingers behind him. His half-drank, overly sweetened coffee sits on the table steaming slightly by the chair he occupied moments before.





Grandfather Relaxing in Front of My Home
Grandfather Relaxing in Front of My Home





I’m fond of him. He’s child-like in his innocence. So sensitive and easily made to cry.

I’ll never forget a few months ago when my father sent me to tell him the bad news. Grand Dad’s sister passed away. I arrived at his door and he opened after my first knock. He held me tight at the door before I could say a word. I assumed the news must have reached him already.

But it hadn’t.

When he learned that she died the previous night he cried and cried. He had a rough life working in his grandfather’s farms. He was orphaned young and his sister was the only mother-figure he had.

My father knows him differently, though. Maybe it’s because to him, Grand Dad is the ruthless man who beat him viciously every day when he was a child. And such is his love for his father, that he still strives for his approval even today.

It’s useless. Grand Dad will never tell him he’s proud.

When my father offers him a cup of coffee, Grand Dad gets mad.

And, now, my father hates the cigarette stink Grand Dad leaves behind.

Author: Jim Yaghi

Jim Yaghi is an advertising consultant and traffic expert, with a background in Artificial Intelligence.

41 thoughts on “The Marketer’s Dirty Little Secret”

  1. This is SO true, it really is what a lot of the major guru's do to succeed, they refraim what other who taught them did.

    So the key then is learning the art of reframing for ourselves, so we can do the same. *GRIN*

    1. @Shawn Rhoades bingo! Find new perspectives to communicate your information that others aren't doing. This sets you apart and places you and your product in a category of your own. You're freed from all the prejudices that potential customers may already have about similar products. When i think back on it, this is how i was brought into network marketing. For some reason, I was made to feel that THIS company i was about to join was of the Network Marketing kind that "works". I remember that distinctly, because i went from hating anything that looks like network marketing to an evangelical distributor for that company.

      @Joe O'Day That's exactly what i'm talking about! Perry's style appeals to you because he's an engineer, presenting with an engineering frame. One thing I like about Perry is how thorough he is. There's very little hype and plenty of substance.

      @Louis Boucher Major You're welcome. Thank you for your kind words.

      @Lane Reiss Yes, you're right about that. We often do this in personal communication. We retell stories in a way that we believe suitable for the audience. The very same event can take on different forms, depending on if you're telling it to someone young or old, male or female, your close friend or an acquaintance.

      @Rebecca Geiger Your creative mind frames those items that are otherwise perceived as "junk" into treasures. Few people would see your vision before it is complete. Imagine how difficult it would be to teach that to someone else! This is why teaching marketing can be so hard–the challenge is making people see possibilities instead of obstacles. Definitely check out NLP if you ever get the chance. My own understanding of it comes from a guy called Christopher Howard.

      @Ron thank you and bless you too man :)

      @Jeff Schechter You're welcome Schecky!

      @David Schwind thanks bro haha you can always reframe it and reuse lol TSLOA 😉 😉

      @Larry Mastel I'm sorry for your loss man but very glad you have found a way to immortalize him for your children. Something I didn't mention in my story was that the reason i have such a positive perception of my grandfather despite his cruelty is that I was raised by my father to love him. I was told only the positive stories because at the end of the day, my father knew he was setting the example for me on how i treat him in his old age. This is important, because what in reality happened is that my father manufactured a frame and sold me on it. I adopted it and it became my own. Now, no matter what happens (good or bad), i always jump to my grandfather's defense. It's a good thing to teach your children about your love for your father, because it will stick with them throughout their lives.

  2. This is SO true, it really is what a lot of the major guru's do to succeed, they refraim what other who taught them did.

    So the key then is learning the art of reframing for ourselves, so we can do the same. *GRIN*

    1. @Shawn Rhoades bingo! Find new perspectives to communicate your information that others aren't doing. This sets you apart and places you and your product in a category of your own. You're freed from all the prejudices that potential customers may already have about similar products. When i think back on it, this is how i was brought into network marketing. For some reason, I was made to feel that THIS company i was about to join was of the Network Marketing kind that “works”. I remember that distinctly, because i went from hating anything that looks like network marketing to an evangelical distributor for that company.

      @Joe O'Day That's exactly what i'm talking about! Perry's style appeals to you because he's an engineer, presenting with an engineering frame. One thing I like about Perry is how thorough he is. There's very little hype and plenty of substance.

      @Louis Boucher Major You're welcome. Thank you for your kind words.

      @Lane Reiss Yes, you're right about that. We often do this in personal communication. We retell stories in a way that we believe suitable for the audience. The very same event can take on different forms, depending on if you're telling it to someone young or old, male or female, your close friend or an acquaintance.

      @Rebecca Geiger Your creative mind frames those items that are otherwise perceived as “junk” into treasures. Few people would see your vision before it is complete. Imagine how difficult it would be to teach that to someone else! This is why teaching marketing can be so hard–the challenge is making people see possibilities instead of obstacles. Definitely check out NLP if you ever get the chance. My own understanding of it comes from a guy called Christopher Howard.

      @Ron thank you and bless you too man :)

      @Jeff Schechter You're welcome Schecky!

      @David Schwind thanks bro haha you can always reframe it and reuse lol TSLOA 😉 😉

      @Larry Mastel I'm sorry for your loss man but very glad you have found a way to immortalize him for your children. Something I didn't mention in my story was that the reason i have such a positive perception of my grandfather despite his cruelty is that I was raised by my father to love him. I was told only the positive stories because at the end of the day, my father knew he was setting the example for me on how i treat him in his old age. This is important, because what in reality happened is that my father manufactured a frame and sold me on it. I adopted it and it became my own. Now, no matter what happens (good or bad), i always jump to my grandfather's defense. It's a good thing to teach your children about your love for your father, because it will stick with them throughout their lives.

  3. Perry Marshall really brainwashes me. He puts so much value out in his newsletters that I read every single one of them. His sales letters read exactly like his newsletters, and then seamlessly move into sale mode. It's an "Aha!" moment every time I realize that it's not another newsletter but actually a sales letter.

    It wouldn't be as powerful in isolation though. As just a sales letter, it would still be effective, but it's really the constant value in the newsletters that get you to keep reading everything he writes.

  4. Perry Marshall really brainwashes me. He puts so much value out in his newsletters that I read every single one of them. His sales letters read exactly like his newsletters, and then seamlessly move into sale mode. It's an “Aha!” moment every time I realize that it's not another newsletter but actually a sales letter.

    It wouldn't be as powerful in isolation though. As just a sales letter, it would still be effective, but it's really the constant value in the newsletters that get you to keep reading everything he writes.

  5. You certainly have a power with words. I feel drawn to your grand father! You're so right. When a marketer learns to frame his message correctly, he can create the emotions he wants. You just proved it!

    Thanks for the demonstration!

  6. You certainly have a power with words. I feel drawn to your grand father! You're so right. When a marketer learns to frame his message correctly, he can create the emotions he wants. You just proved it!

    Thanks for the demonstration!

  7. Hi Jim,

    Your story is a great illustration of the framing technique. And your three examples show that each marketer had a different target market in mind. Even though you have your own perspective of your grandfather, you could further filter that perspective, depending on who you were delievering the message to, and what you wanted them to know about you and your grandfather.

    Certain elements of your story would appeal to certain people. If you wanted to target that subset of your reader base, you would expand on those elements that have already elicited a positive response from them. Then you are framing your story based on your own perspective, but specific to your target market.

    Very cool stuff. I've heard the term NLP thrown around for some time, but your story was a really cool way to introduce the concept.

    Lane Reiss

  8. Hi Jim,

    Your story is a great illustration of the framing technique. And your three examples show that each marketer had a different target market in mind. Even though you have your own perspective of your grandfather, you could further filter that perspective, depending on who you were delievering the message to, and what you wanted them to know about you and your grandfather.

    Certain elements of your story would appeal to certain people. If you wanted to target that subset of your reader base, you would expand on those elements that have already elicited a positive response from them. Then you are framing your story based on your own perspective, but specific to your target market.

    Very cool stuff. I've heard the term NLP thrown around for some time, but your story was a really cool way to introduce the concept.

    Lane Reiss

  9. It is funny how experiences clouds your vision of what you think you "see" and how you think you are "right". The biggest challenge in all of this is to be aware of what you see and decide if it is right for you to continue to think in that manner.

    I know for myself I love taking old pieces of junk and revamping them into a treasure that most people would admire like my vintage 50's TV cabinet with a plasma TV inside it.

    Wouldn't it be wonderful if it was easy to change thoughts about our past in the same way. Just rip out the guts of the things that don't work and put the good stuff, plug it in and turn it on!

    Like the example of your Dad had a rough childhood (junk) but now as an adult to be able to see it differently and see your Grandad in a new way or have new happier feelings for him (treasure)..

    Now if we could all learn how to do this for reasons that are for personal mental health.. the world would be a better place!

    I think I am going to have to explore NLP as I have heard about it in the past little while.

    Thanks for the tip! As you always do, you are making the world a better place…!

    Rebecca

  10. It is funny how experiences clouds your vision of what you think you “see” and how you think you are “right”. The biggest challenge in all of this is to be aware of what you see and decide if it is right for you to continue to think in that manner.
    I know for myself I love taking old pieces of junk and revamping them into a treasure that most people would admire like my vintage 50's TV cabinet with a plasma TV inside it.
    Wouldn't it be wonderful if it was easy to change thoughts about our past in the same way. Just rip out the guts of the things that don't work and put the good stuff, plug it in and turn it on!
    Like the example of your Dad had a rough childhood (junk) but now as an adult to be able to see it differently and see your Grandad in a new way or have new happier feelings for him (treasure)..
    Now if we could all learn how to do this for reasons that are for personal mental health.. the world would be a better place!
    I think I am going to have to explore NLP as I have heard about it in the past little while.
    Thanks for the tip! As you always do, you are making the world a better place…!
    Rebecca

  11. Mark,

    Such a beautiful reflection on the life of someone so important in your life. Life is rich or poor based on the relationships in it. Your life is extremely rich, and you are a blessed man, because you understand that.

    May God bless your grandfather in his final days, and beyond. God is blessing you, because you understand the real wealth we all have been given.

    —Ron Eason

  12. Mark,

    Such a beautiful reflection on the life of someone so important in your life. Life is rich or poor based on the relationships in it. Your life is extremely rich, and you are a blessed man, because you understand that.

    May God bless your grandfather in his final days, and beyond. God is blessing you, because you understand the real wealth we all have been given.

    —Ron Eason

  13. Hi Jim,

    You have a very interesting style of writing as I was drawn to every word. I recently lost my 92 year old father, who maintained a razor sharp memory into his last days. I recorded many of my last visits with him for his great grandchildren and beyond to be able to know details about a remarkable man who has passed from death onto life.

    I absolutely treasure the recorded moments with my father, Frank, and would recommend you do the same using ideas from "Touching Tomorrow". I have written about my father and his surprise visit from the nursing home to his beloved county home by engineering a 35 mile cab ride in "coming home to stay at 92".

    Wishing you peace in your days with the treasured moments you still have with your grandfather. Thank you for sharing. Larry

    [img ]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2353/2197790881_c65e3c0a3d_s.jpg[/img]

  14. Hi Jim,
    You have a very interesting style of writing as I was drawn to every word. I recently lost my 92 year old father, who maintained a razor sharp memory into his last days. I recorded many of my last visits with him for his great grandchildren and beyond to be able to know details about a remarkable man who has passed from death onto life.

    I absolutely treasure the recorded moments with my father, Frank, and would recommend you do the same using ideas from “Touching Tomorrow”. I have written about my father and his surprise visit from the nursing home to his beloved county home by engineering a 35 mile cab ride in “coming home to stay at 92”.

    Wishing you peace in your days with the treasured moments you still have with your grandfather. Thank you for sharing. Larry
    [img <a href="http:// ]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2353/2197790881_c65e3c0a3d_s.jpg[/img]” target=”_blank”> <a href="http://]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2353/2197790881_c65e3c0a3d_s.jpg%5B/img%5D” target=”_blank”>]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2353/2197790881_c65e3c0a3d_s.jpg[/img]

  15. Jim,

    Another great post. You have a style of writing that is well beyond your years.

    I lost my grandfather 47 years ago when I was 10, but he lived with us and the memories of his pipe and cigars linger with me to this day.

    My dad has been gone for 20 years now and you are correct the memories you have of one generation to the next can be quite different.

    Great job of framing. My personal favorites are Frank Kern and his teacher John Carlton.

    Thanks for the post once again, Denis

  16. Jim,

    Another great post. You have a style of writing that is well beyond your years.

    I lost my grandfather 47 years ago when I was 10, but he lived with us and the memories of his pipe and cigars linger with me to this day.
    My dad has been gone for 20 years now and you are correct the memories you have of one generation to the next can be quite different.
    Great job of framing. My personal favorites are Frank Kern and his teacher John Carlton.
    Thanks for the post once again, Denis

  17. [img ]http://www.google.com/friendconnect/profile/picture/bQKdxOGpHGswa1J9OwsTq8Zoe1oMp5zYKXh9Mj-4EtB8QIjZ3AT0IwQUobbSmyt0tY7zmxXDeRGgaxersLcC9224hni7wWQ2SSl904L5AU3TtIpbpyzuWQ[/img]Loved the way you told your Grandfather's story. Brings back so many memories for me. My grandfather lived with us as a child and was much kinder to us grandchildren than to his own children, which included my father. Weird how life is sometimes. It seems they mellow with age and try harder to connect with the grandchildren. It's so true how the same person or thing can be viewed totally differently by each individual. We can definitely use this in our marketing and in how people view us. Keep up the great work.

    Denis

  18. [img <a href="http:// ]http://www.google.com/friendconnect/profile/picture/bQKdxOGpHGswa1J9OwsTq8Zoe1oMp5zYKXh9Mj-4EtB8QIjZ3AT0IwQUobbSmyt0tY7zmxXDeRGgaxersLcC9224hni7wWQ2SSl904L5AU3TtIpbpyzuWQ[/img]Loved” target=”_blank”> <a href="http://]http://www.google.com/friendconnect/profile/picture/bQKdxOGpHGswa1J9OwsTq8Zoe1oMp5zYKXh9Mj-4EtB8QIjZ3AT0IwQUobbSmyt0tY7zmxXDeRGgaxersLcC9224hni7wWQ2SSl904L5AU3TtIpbpyzuWQ%5B/img%5DLoved” target=”_blank”>]http://www.google.com/friendconnect/profile/picture/bQKdxOGpHGswa1J9OwsTq8Zoe1oMp5zYKXh9Mj-4EtB8QIjZ3AT0IwQUobbSmyt0tY7zmxXDeRGgaxersLcC9224hni7wWQ2SSl904L5AU3TtIpbpyzuWQ[/img]Loved the way you told your Grandfather's story. Brings back so many memories for me. My grandfather lived with us as a child and was much kinder to us grandchildren than to his own children, which included my father. Weird how life is sometimes. It seems they mellow with age and try harder to connect with the grandchildren. It's so true how the same person or thing can be viewed totally differently by each individual. We can definitely use this in our marketing and in how people view us. Keep up the great work.
    Denis

  19. My mom died of liver cancer at about age 50; but I choose to believe she is in a better place. There is some re-framing for you.

    Mom and dad divorced before I was two years old and the last time I saw her was on my 5th birthday (I never knew where she was after that). Then at about 30 I heard she was sick and "met" her just before she died.

    Sour grapes might say "I never knew my mom, how terrible." but I re framed it into a prayer answered. I had often thought 'I wanted to see her before she died' and that's just what happened. I'm thinking God gave me just what I asked for.

    So, here's another prayer… God Bless Jim his family, and everyone (like me) who see his information and wisdom as valuable and perhaps inspired.

  20. My mom died of liver cancer at about age 50; but I choose to believe she is in a better place. There is some re-framing for you.
    Mom and dad divorced before I was two years old and the last time I saw her was on my 5th birthday (I never knew where she was after that). Then at about 30 I heard she was sick and “met” her just before she died.
    Sour grapes might say “I never knew my mom, how terrible.” but I re framed it into a prayer answered. I had often thought 'I wanted to see her before she died' and that's just what happened. I'm thinking God gave me just what I asked for.
    So, here's another prayer… God Bless Jim his family, and everyone (like me) who see his information and wisdom as valuable and perhaps inspired.

  21. I'm sorry that your Grandfather has to contend with cancer in his final years. It's a good thing you are living so close to him. You are probably his biggest pleasure each day. Treasure the time you have left together.

    I really admire your Dad. He taught you to love your Grandfather despite the harsh treatment he has received from childhood even to the present time. Your Dad is a good role model. Time passes so quickly and grandparents and parents pass away too soon. Thank you for sharing your story.

    Thank you also for the work you did in PPC Domination. It has helped me understand adwords so much better. Keep up the good work.

  22. I'm sorry that your Grandfather has to contend with cancer in his final years. It's a good thing you are living so close to him. You are probably his biggest pleasure each day. Treasure the time you have left together.

    I really admire your Dad. He taught you to love your Grandfather despite the harsh treatment he has received from childhood even to the present time. Your Dad is a good role model. Time passes so quickly and grandparents and parents pass away too soon. Thank you for sharing your story.

    Thank you also for the work you did in PPC Domination. It has helped me understand adwords so much better. Keep up the good work.

  23. Jim, you display such eloquence in your writing… I needed to read this as my frustration has me frozen and wondering how I will tap a market rich with competition. Brilliant again! We are blessed to have your expressive array with story telling. Enjoy these days with your grand dad! After losing my dad to cancer….I always try to find good in every thing and the only good thing about cancer is that you often have time to focus on spending quality moments, as opposed to other situations of sudden death. take care!

  24. Jim, you display such eloquence in your writing… I needed to read this as my frustration has me frozen and wondering how I will tap a market rich with competition. Brilliant again! We are blessed to have your expressive array with story telling. Enjoy these days with your grand dad! After losing my dad to cancer….I always try to find good in every thing and the only good thing about cancer is that you often have time to focus on spending quality moments, as opposed to other situations of sudden death. take care!

  25. Hi Jim

    If you remain the man you are now, you will be VERY famous one day. You already have many fans mate

    Regards

    Kerry

  26. Hi Jim
    If you remain the man you are now, you will be VERY famous one day. You already have many fans mate
    Regards
    Kerry

  27. Hi Jim,

    Thanks for sharing your feelings. I too was my grandfather's favorite. Maybe because we had the same first name, I don't know. I do know I was always there for him, no matter what it was; checking in, weekly yard maintenance, watching old movies with him.

    Anyway, he passed on from school-house earth over thirty-two years ago……wow! can't believe it's been that long. Sure, I heard about him being very strict with his three daughters and how he almost lost his life to alcoholism, but, that never bothered me because I admired him for always being responsible to his family and his business in spite of his younger alcoholic years; unlike his brothers and most weak people.

    To get to the point, my perception of him was different than most people. I didn't care what I heard others say about him; friends, family, etc. He lived about twenty-seven more years after the Dr.'s gave him a fifty/fifty chance to live. To me that's an awesome accomplishment. After all this, I believe the reason grandparents spoil or treat grandchildren different than parents treat children is because there isn't a direct responsibility anymore and don't feel there's a need for children to be disciplined by four adults; two is enough. Also let's face it, grandparent's have more wisdom in their golden years.

    In regards to NLP: You are not what you think you are. You are not what other people think you are. You are what YOU think other people think you are.

    Peace!

    John Corona

  28. Hi Jim,

    Thanks for sharing your feelings. I too was my grandfather's favorite. Maybe because we had the same first name, I don't know. I do know I was always there for him, no matter what it was; checking in, weekly yard maintenance, watching old movies with him.

    Anyway, he passed on from school-house earth over thirty-two years ago……wow! can't believe it's been that long. Sure, I heard about him being very strict with his three daughters and how he almost lost his life to alcoholism, but, that never bothered me because I admired him for always being responsible to his family and his business in spite of his younger alcoholic years; unlike his brothers and most weak people.

    To get to the point, my perception of him was different than most people. I didn't care what I heard others say about him; friends, family, etc. He lived about twenty-seven more years after the Dr.'s gave him a fifty/fifty chance to live. To me that's an awesome accomplishment. After all this, I believe the reason grandparents spoil or treat grandchildren different than parents treat children is because there isn't a direct responsibility anymore and don't feel there's a need for children to be disciplined by four adults; two is enough. Also let's face it, grandparent's have more wisdom in their golden years.

    In regards to NLP: You are not what you think you are. You are not what other people think you are. You are what YOU think other people think you are.

    Peace!

    John Corona

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