Double Digit CTR – Part 3

Experiment 3 – Split-Testing Ads to Increase Conversion

Over the weekend, I began testing a second ad variation. The reason was that of the two running ads: Ad #1 had a click-thru-rate of 15% and Ad #2 had a click-thru-rate of 3.5%.

Additionally, Ad #1 (higher CTR) was converting at 7%, while Ad #2 (lower CTR) was converting at 17%.

I killed Ad #2. Then created a new version of it with the same body because it was most likely responsible for the high conversion rate–and replaced its headline with the headline of Ad #1 because that is the most likely cause of the Ad #1’s high click-thru-rate.

Really busy. Much to do. And very sick.

Popped in for a quickie today…to report on the experiment results.

Remember a few days ago I discovered a keyword research method that gets double-digit Click-thru-rates on my PPC ads. Unfortunately, the new technique at the time gave me zero conversions.

A mistake I’d made was that I ran the ads against a brand new un-tested landing page, effectively testing TWO variables at once: The new keyword strategy AND the new landing page.

Well, later in that same Double Digit CTR experiment, I reverted back to the original landing page to undo that minstake. That page had been tried and tested for months and converted at 10-12% with other keywords. So I ran it for a few hours to see if it fared better.

And sure enough, it did. So for Double-Digit CTR Experiment #2 I cleaned up the 500 keywords and narrowed them down to only 3.

The 3 keywords I kept were the “diamond in the rough”. At the time, they were running with a combined CTR of 9%, several hundred impressions, and had at least one conversion in the few hours they sent serachers to the original landing page.

In Experiment 2, I tested and created the control: Those three keywords were left running over the next 24-hours without any further changes of any kind, in order to be sure that they continued to convert. And I’m happy to report that they did.

Experiment 3 – Split-Testing Ads to Increase Conversion

Over the weekend, I began testing a second ad variation. The reason was that of the two running ads: Ad #1 had a click-thru-rate of 15% and Ad #2 had a click-thru-rate of 3.5%.

Additionally, Ad #1 (higher CTR) was converting at 7%, while Ad #2 (lower CTR) was converting at 17%.

I killed Ad #2. Then created a new version of it with the same body because it was most likely responsible for the high conversion rate–and replaced its headline with the headline of Ad #1 because that is the most likely cause of the Ad #1’s high click-thru-rate.

I left this to run over the rest of the weekend and today. 

The result? 13.8% conversion at $5 CPA (a bit high still), and combined CTR of 12%.

Today (so far) that single adgroup with 3 keywords has produced 9 conversions. Whereas before it was lucky to get 9 conversions a week.

Good Job!

What’s next?

The Cost Per Acquisition (CPA) is still too high for my liking. I need to make split-tests with the landing page and try to increase my conversion rate another few percent. Also, the high CTR will likely be rewarded over time with lower bid costs, so it will go down on its own.

Today, I’m ready to replicate this for another adgroup.

I shared with you these results to show you how methodical you need to be when playing the game of Google Adwords. And to show you that I too make mistakes and run into difficulty…then I keep at it until I resolve it.


To learn more of Jim’s PPC advertising techniques, check out PPC Domination.

Author: Jim Yaghi

Jim Yaghi is an advertising consultant and traffic expert, with a background in Artificial Intelligence.

2 thoughts on “Double Digit CTR – Part 3”

  1. Way to go! (ps, sorry that you are not feeling well ;(

    That is awesome. So basically what you are saying is that you must make sure your landing page works if you are going to up the ante about conversion rates? is that right? for newbies like us who start from scratch TEST TEST TEST!

    cool!…

  2. Way to go! (ps, sorry that you are not feeling well ;(
    That is awesome. So basically what you are saying is that you must make sure your landing page works if you are going to up the ante about conversion rates? is that right? for newbies like us who start from scratch TEST TEST TEST!
    cool!…

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